Home Page


Huntsville Information

Huntsville, Alabama USA is one of the most recognized cities in the Southeast consistently named as one of the best places to live and work by a variety of national publications. Our city is regularly named as a premier location for both business and quality of life. Technology, space, and defense industries have a major presence here with the Army's Redstone Arsenal, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, and Cummings Research Park. Home to several Fortune 500 companies, Huntsville also offers a broad base of manufacturing, retail and service industries. Our quality of life is second to none with a variety of educational, recreational, and cultural opportunities. We successfully combine the rich heritage of Southern hospitality with innovative high-tech ventures and cultural diversity.

Huntsville Profile
The high-tech city of Huntsville which sprawls at the foot of a mountain in North Alabama is equally at home in the 19th century or the 21st. Huntsville's tourist attractions reflect the heritage of Alabama's first English-speaking city, the strife of the American Civil War, and the accomplishments of America's rocket scientists. Huntsville's population truly reflects international cultures. Of the 180,000 city residents, more than 10 percent are natives of other countries. More than 100 languages and dialects are spoken here. In addition to the German rocket scientists who arrived in 1950, for example, Huntsville is home to the first U.S. plant built by Korea's largest corporation. Several Japanese-owned companies operate manufacturing plants here. Scores of foreign national flags ring the roof of the headquarters of an international computer manufacturing firm headquartered in Huntsville. Huntsville's visitor attractions offer a wealth of activities for the native and international visitor alike. Visitors who want to be "astronauts for a day" can sample astronaut training activities at the sprawling U.S. Space and Rocket Center. The hands-on showcase of space technology is the state's largest tourist attraction. It is home to the internationally known U.S. Space Camp which has franchise operations in Japan, Belgium and Canada. A variety of city museums downtown and an outstanding symphony orchestra offer rich cultural opportunities involving the arts. The legendary Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, which encompasses 21 courses in eight cities in Alabama, begins here at the 54-hole Hampton Cove Golf Course. Hampton Cove features two championship courses surrounded by mountains and lakes. Alabama now ranks fifth in the nation for public golf courses per resident.

The Birthplace of Alabama Pioneer John Hunt, for whom the city is named, occupied a cabin alongside a spring here in 1805. A town soon flourished and was the largest in the Alabama Territory by 1819. That year the leaders of the Alabama Territory met here to petition the U.S. Congress to grant Alabama statehood. The recreated 1819 Alabama Constitution Village, a block from the courthouse square, commemorates the historic events through tours given by costumed guides. Huntsville was the cotton trading center of the Tennessee Valley during the 1840s and '50s when planters and merchants originally from Virginia and the Carolinas built impressive town homes. LeRoy Pope, who purchased land at auction and donated land for t he town, originally picked the name Twickenham. He wanted to honor the London suburb which was home to poet Alexander Pope, a relative. However, following the War of 1812, the name reverted to Huntsville to honor the first white man who settled here. Walking tours of the Twickenham historic district, with the state's largest collection of pre-Civil War homes, are popular year-round. Because many wealthy businessmen remained loyal to the Union at the start of the Civil War, the town was spared the destruction by occupying armies. Plan also to visit the 1819 Weeden House Museum and the 1860 Huntsville Depot Museum. A unique shopping opportunity is offered at the 1879 Harrison Brothers Hardware Store. Restored 19th century cabins and farm buildings are displayed at the mountaintop Burritt Museum and Park.

America's Space Capital
Huntsville was still a cotton market town of 16,437 people in 1950 when U.S. Sen. John Sparkman (who lived in Huntsville's historic Twickenham neighborhood) brought a band of German rocket scientists to Redstone Arsenal to develop rockets for the U.S. Army. By the end of the decade, Wernher von Braun's team had developed the rocket which orbited America's first satellite. They eventually put the first American in space and transported the first astronauts to the Moon. Redstone Arsenal is one of the U.S. Army's most important strategic posts. It is responsible for research, development, production and worldwide support of missiles, aviation, rockets and related programs. The influx of engineers, scientists and other technical specialists has transformed the small town into a cosmopolitan community which nonetheless maintains its heritage and reputation for hospitality. For more historical information on Redstone Arsenal and Huntsville, visit www.redstone.army.mil/history. The Huntsville area remains one of the South's fastest-growing. The county's population is estimated at 260,000. It has the highest per capita income in the Southeast. Atlanta's is second. The nearby city of Madison, just west of Cummings Research Park, is experiencing rapid growth. The Hampton Cove area on U.S. 431 south is the fastest growing residential area within Huntsville's city limits. A legacy of the space program which benefits visitors is the renowned U.S. Space & Rocket Center. Guests can experience astronaut-training activities, feel simulated weightlessness and view large-screen movies filmed by astronauts in space. The Center's U.S. Space Camp attracts young people from throughout the world who spend a week experiencing space flight training and participate in mock space missions. It was Von Braun himself who inspired Space Camp. He suggested that the space museum develop an intensive youth science program to stimulate chidren's interest in math and science. Guided bus tours of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center take visitors through large hangar-sized buildings such as where engineers are building the nation's first permanent space station. They also visit giant outdoor test stands where America's rockets have been test fired. Adjacent to the space museum is the beautiful Huntsville Botanical Garden which features floral and aquatic gardens.Despite becoming the space capital of America, Huntsville maintains close contact with its past. The literal birthplace, "the big spring," still flows from a rock bluff underneath the 1835 Regions Bank. It winds through a lushly landscaped park into a lake surrounded by scores of trees. A new three-story building to house the Huntsville Museum of Art has been built in Big Spring Park.Facing the park is the city's civic and convention center named for the legendary German-born rocket scientist. The Von Braun Center contains an arena, exhibit hall, banquet hall, theater and meeting rooms. A variety of special events, ranging from tours of historic homes in the spring to the Big Spring Jam music festival in September and brillantly lighted Christmas festivals in December, fill the annual calendar of events. Air travelers arrive at the Huntsville International Airport just 12 miles west of Huntsville. Some 70 jet flights depart daily in addition to several weekly non-stop freight flights to Europe. Huntsville, Alabama USA.
We have space available for you.

Incorporated Form of Government Council: Mayor
Population (Estimate May, 2001): 158,216
Area (in square miles): 174.43
Altitude (in feet above sea level): 600
G.O. Bond Rating: Moody's Aa, Standard & Poor's AA
City Sales Tax Rate: 3.5%
County Sales Tax Rate: 0.5%
State Sales Tax Rate: 4.0%
City Property Tax Rate (Per $100 of Assessed Valuation): 5.80

Climate
National Weather Service Climate Information for Huntsville, AL
Huntsville International Airport
Flight Activity and Aircraft Operations Statistical Information
Fire and Police
Fire and Rescue Dept. Employees: 341
Fire Stations: 17
Sworn Police Officers: 363
Police Field Offices: 3 Precincts and 1 Administration Building

Housing / Human Services
Federally Assisted Housing (Number of Units): 2,620

Parks, Recreation
Total Park Acreage: 1,879
Parks Cleaned and Maintained: 48
City Recreation Centers: 11
Municipal Golf Courses: 1
Other Public Golf Courses: 5
Country Club Golf Courses: 2
Miles of Bicycle Pathways: 2
Municipal Swimming Pools: 3
Municipal Tennis Courts (Lighted): 16
Municipal Tennis Courts (Day Use Only): 75
Other Public and Private Tennis Courts: 40

Library
Libraries: 11 plus Main Branch and Bookmobile
Library Book Volumes: 541,083

Public Transit
Shuttle Bus Routes: 11
Average Daily Ridership: 1,135
Miles of Service Annually: 568,238

Administration: Tommy Battle, Mayor...(256) 427-5000
City Administrator: John Hamilton
Economic Development: Michelle Jordan, Director...(256) 427-5182
Operation Green Team: Joy McKee ...(256) 427-5048
Public Communications: Kelly Schrimsher...(256) 427-5006
Animal Services: Karen Sheppard, Director...(256) 883-3630
Animal Community Communications: Mary Ultz...(256) 883-3630
Cemetery: Joy McKee, Director...(256) 427-5730
City Attorney's Office: Peter Joffrion, City Attorney...(256) 427-5026
City Clerk/Treasurer: Chuck Hagood, Clerk/Treasurer...(256) 427-5088
City Council: Mark Russell, President...(256) 427-5011
Community Development: Kenneth Benion, Director...(256) 427-5400
Emergency Management Agency: John "Rusty" Russell, Director...(256) 427-5130
Engineering: Shane Davis, City Engineer...(256) 427-5300
Facilities: Jeff Easter, Director...(256) 427-5666
Finance: Randy Taylor, Director...(256) 427-5080
Fire and Rescue: Howard "Mac" McFarlen, Acting Fire Chief...(256) 427-7401
Fleet Management: Celena Stone, Manager...(256) 883-3937
Facilities Projects Mgt.: Chris O'Neil, Manager...(256) 427-5281
Human Resources: Byron Thomas, Director...(256) 427-5241
Information Technology Services: Bill Steiner, Interim Director...(256) 427-6713
Inspection: Randy Cunningham,Interim Director...(256) 427-5331
Municipal Court Sonny Rodenhauser, Presiding Judge...(256) 427-7803
Safety City: Scott Erwin...(256) 883-3724
Natural Resources: Danny Shea, Director...(256) 427-5750
Parking and Public Transit: Tommy Brown, Director...(256) 427-6811
Parking: Bobby Allen, Manager...(256) 427-6800
Public Transportation: Kim Garrett, Manager...(256) 427-6811
Police: Lewis Morris, Police Chief...(256) 427-7001
Public Works: Terry Hatfield, Director...(256) 883-3944
Drainage & Streets:Jackie Burgreen, Manager(256) 883-3944
Sanitation Services: Kathy Hunt, Manager (256) 883-3944
Recreation Services: Greg Patterson, Director...(256) 427-5230
Landscape Management: Joy McKee, Director...(256) 427-5233
Recreation Services: Steve Ivey, Manager...(256) 427-5230
Urban Forestry and Horticulture: Marc Byers, Manager...(256) 883-3707
Traffic Engineering and Operations: Richard P. Kramer, Director...(256) 427-6850
Urban Development: Shane Davis, Director...(256) 427-5100
Planning: Dennis Madsen and Marie Bostick, Manager...(256) 427-5100
Water Pollution Conrol: Shane Cook, Director...(256) 883-3668

2004 City Holidays
The City of Huntsville will observe the following holidays in 2009:
New Years Day----------------------Monday, January 1
Floating Holiday -------------------Friday, January 2
Martin Luther King Jr., Day-----------Monday, January 19
Memorial Day (Observed)----------Monday, May 25
Independence Day(Observed)------------------Friday, July 3
Labor Day----------------------------Monday, September 7
Veteran's Day --------------Wednesday, November 11
Thanksgiving------------------------Thursday, November 26
Floating Holiday ------------------ Friday, November 27
Floating Holiday---------------------Thursday, December 24
Christmas Day-----------------------Friday, December 25